Stop, Drop, and Roll into some Helpful Hints to get you Fire Ready

I’ve never personally been through a house fire, but I know friends and family that have, and it is devastating. In many cases, most possessions of material and sentimental value are lost, and the residents are left to pick up the pieces and start over.

No matter how careful we are – keeping heaters clear, resisting the temptation to stick just one more plug in the outlet, and hiding the matches away from kids – there may still be forces beyond our control or knowledge that sparks the preliminary flame; lightning strikes, a wayward flicked cigarette, or a badly wired heat lamp in your roommate’s secret marijuana garden (true story!) can be sudden and unexpected fire hazards, so it’s important to always be prepared.

Nothing but time can soothe the feelings of loss and distress over losing a home, but these tips may help in salvaging the important building blocks to a faster recovery, and ensuring the best chance of survival for you and your family if misfortune does strike.

The Things You’ll Want to Have

-Smoke detector-

I never liked the ear-splitting screeches of alarm systems, but I admit they are extremely effective in signaling that something’s wrong. Installing a smoke detector in your home can potentially alert you, and everyone in the house, to the presence of fire before you would have noticed it yourself, and with something as quick to spread as fire, every second counts. Smoke detectors will let you know with short, persistent beeps when the batteries are low and need to be changed, but it’s good to change them at least once a year.

-Fireproofed containers-

Although you unfortunately can’t save everything in a fire, there are some things that should be protected in case one does occur. Important documents such as birth certificates, social security, insurance papers, passports and the like should be stored in fireproof containers. Identification, credentials, and proof of insurance are some of the first things you’ll need on the path of recovery, so decide which documents are most important and don’t delay in ensuring that they’re safe.

-Emergency food storage-

Meals can be expensive, and with the loss of a home, you’d want to focus funds on getting back on your feet as quickly as possible. Having access to cheap, nutritious food can help alleviate that particular source of stress. There are kit options available that provide enough food to feed families for months to years for less than $2 a meal, saving you that much more money to put toward rebuilding to stability.

The Things You Might Not Have Thought About

-Escape plan-

Remember those fire drills we had to endlessly practice in grade school? By the end of each year, they were so routine, we could practically evacuate the building in our sleep – in fact, I’m pretty sure some of my classmates did do it in their sleep. Well, an evacuation plan is no less important to regularly practice in your home. Note each route in every room of the house with alternatives in case a path becomes blocked. Be sure to walk and talk the plan through with young children at least twice a year, and it never hurts to remind the older kids either. Knowing where to go will help keep everyone a bit calmer and get everyone to safety faster.

-A clear path-

An escape plan might not be any good if your designated pathways become blocked. Regularly cleaning house and clearing clutter reduces the chance of tripping or knocking into things, potentially causing injury or wasting precious time on the way out. Stacks and boxes of flammable objects are especially important to keep tidy and out of the way.

-Get to know your neighborhood-

Houses are built so close together these days, so the risk of fire spread is higher. If you feel your neighbor’s house is hazardously close, talk it over with them and make plans about how to alert each other if one house catches fire and how to cooperatively handle the situation.

The Benefits of Alternative Medicine

I am not a doctor, don’t take my word or anyone else, but your own.

In the event that there is a collapse of civilization. The supply of common medicine will become non existent very fast. Not to long ago people relied on natural medicine, many of these have been disapproved for use by the FDA. While I am far from a expert on natural medicine, have and use a few will very good results.

My number one survival medicine is MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution) this is a stupid name and I was very wary of it at first. But a good friend of mine said it work great for his son. So I tried it, the detox is horrible and it taste like your drinking chlorine LOL.

So after a couple months I noticed the mouth sores that I had suffered from since I was a child were gone, my IBS mellowed and the first night I took it I slept like a rock.

This was 2 years ago and the cold sores are still gone, the IBS is not even a problem. I carry a bottle in my BOB, and keep a bottle in my kitchen. This is not a daily use item, it should only be used it needed or detoxing.

The next mineral is Silver. The medical uses of silver include its use as an antiseptic, a disinfectant, and an alternative medicine product known as colloidal silver. I use it as a immune booster, and I have not been sick since.

Basic Colloidal Silver Generators can be build for a few dollars, with proper research, with anything you must do your own research, and decide if it is right for you.

If you would like to see what people are saying about these and other Alternative Medicines try the CureZone.com Forum.

I’m not trying to sell these to you, I am just saying you should find what works for you, learn the natural ways of healing, the doctors medicine may not always be there.

When Batteries Go Bad: A cycle that keeps going and going and going…

I don’t know about you, but I go through batteries very quickly. The things I often use them for has changed, from my Gameboy and MP3 player to Xbox controllers and my digital camera, but the consumption rate has largely remained the same.

However, while we may be used to changing batteries in our everyday-use electronics, it’s easy to forget that the things we don’t use as often need battery changes every once in awhile as well. It’s especially important for the equipment you have on standby in case of a disaster, because the last thing you want is to find your equipment not working when you need it most.

See that nasty, fuzzy, powdery-looking stuff? That’s battery corrosion; the result of battery acid leakage that builds over time. It can cause damage to your equipment if not cleaned and can even render it non-functional.

Heat can accelerate this process, so storing your equipment in a cool area is a good idea. There’s no real timeline to point to as to when corrosion happens, it can depend on the type of battery and other factors, so changing out batteries regularly is your best bet to prevent it from happening. You may want to make it into a once-a-year or every other year routine for the best results.

-Cleaning Corrosion-

Changing out batteries before this happens is ideal, but if you’ve noticed corrosion starting, you’ll want to get it cleaned as soon as possible. Make sure not to touch the corroded areas as they are acidic, and use a tissue, cloth, or gloves to remove the batteries. If you do touch it, make sure to wash your hands thoroughly.

To clean the corrosion, mix a little water and baking soda, apply to a q-tip and rub the affected areas until all signs of corrosion are gone. Baking soda is a base, so it will neutralize the acid and prevent further damage. Make sure to completely dry your equipment before putting fresh batteries back in.